19 November 2013

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The Furry Friend Factor [Infographic]

Over 46 percent of households in the United States have at least one furry, four-legged canine for whom they love and care. A considerable 12 percent have three of more canines living under the same roof. There is little doubt that we humans love our dogs as pets. There are a huge number of reasons for this deep affection that is pervasive throughout the country, a number of which can be explained by a small look at the psychology that applies to dogs that we love like family members. To begin with, dogs and humans have been developing together for thousands of years. Man has relied on dogs for companionship and hunting since as early as 12,000 B.C.. As man's capacity for emotions developed from the beginning of time, so have those of dogs. They are able to feel the vast majority of feelings that we humans feel. They get excited, experience joy, can be shy, and feel distress as well. The spectrum of their internal lives is vast despite the fact that their long-term memory is quite limited when compared to ours. However, dogs have also been lucky enough to avoid developing some emotional reactions for which only humans are known. These include feelings related to pride, guilt, shame, and other negative states of mind. The most valued characteristic in the eyes of humans that dogs have developed, although, is the capacity to love. This ability is what allows us to welcome them into our hearts and treat them as equals in many ways. [...]


Over 46 percent of households in the United States have at least one furry, four-legged canine for whom they love and care. A considerable 12 percent have three of more canines living under the same roof. There is little doubt that we humans love our dogs as pets. There are a huge number of reasons for this deep affection that is pervasive throughout the country, a number of which can be explained by a small look at the psychology that applies to dogs that we love like family members.

To begin with, dogs and humans have been developing together for thousands of years. Man has relied on dogs for companionship and hunting since as early as 12,000 B.C.. As man's capacity for emotions developed from the beginning of time, so have those of dogs. They are able to feel the vast majority of feelings that we humans feel. They get excited, experience joy, can be shy, and feel distress as well. The spectrum of their internal lives is vast despite the fact that their long-term memory is quite limited when compared to ours. However, dogs have also been lucky enough to avoid developing some emotional reactions for which only humans are known. These include feelings related to pride, guilt, shame, and other negative states of mind. The most valued characteristic in the eyes of humans that dogs have developed, although, is the capacity to love. This ability is what allows us to welcome them into our hearts and treat them as equals in many ways.

Beyond sharing unconditional love with their owners, it has also been shown that dogs provide many other benefits to the average household. Dogs must be exercised either by walking or jogging. It has been shown that pet owners who engage in this activity with their dog are much more likely to be in good health when compared to individuals who do not own dogs. The dogs certainly enjoy this experience, and researchers have discovered that dogs can feel a certain “runner's high” that is comparable to that in humans, only more intense. Bringing a dog into your life will allow you to feel connected to nature and another creature in a very unique way. You both share the capacity to dream, love, and desire the absolute best out of life.


The Psychology of Dogs
Source: BestPsychologyDegrees.com - Your Degree Guide


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