14 January 2014

, , , ,

Warm 2013 Stirs Debate

Everyone maintains their own unique opinions about global warming. Even scientific data is sliced in various ways to support arguments falling on both sides of the issue. So it is with great anticipation that climatologists assemble year-end information about global weather conditions. While preliminary studies have been released for the calendar year 2013, the data used to compile findings is actually based on information gleaned from January through October. The full-year report will follow in March, once the November and December figures are assessed. A preliminary look at 2013, illustrates a comparatively warm year, perhaps ranking among the warmest average temperatures in history. In addition to last year's data, the UK Met Office released a forecast for similarly warm conditions in 2014. [...]

Everyone maintains their own unique opinions about global warming. Even scientific data is
sliced in various ways to support arguments falling on both sides of the issue. So it is with great
anticipation that climatologists assemble year-end information about global weather conditions.

While preliminary studies have been released for the calendar year 2013, the data used to
compile findings is actually based on information gleaned from January through October. The
full-year report will follow in March, once the November and December figures are assessed.

A preliminary look at 2013, illustrates a comparatively warm year, perhaps ranking among the
warmest average temperatures in history. In addition to last year's data, the UK Met Office 
released a forecast for similarly warm conditions in 2014.

Facts and Figures
To create a reference point for comparison, a long-term average global temperature has been
established by monitoring conditions from 1961 until 1990. Over this time span, a 14.0 degree
Celsius average has been detected, providing a baseline for current temperature assessments.

In 2013, the temperature deviated from the standard by somewhere between .39 and .59 Celsius
degrees. Using the middle point figure of .49, 2013 ranks within the top ten warmest years on
record. The early data supports 2013 as being warmer than 2012, which was expected and
predicted as part of the Met Office report of that year.

The temperature readings behind long-term calculations are taken at three primary locations:
The Met Office of East Anglia, The national Climatology Data Center and the NASA Institute of
Space Studies. While the conclusions drawn about 2013 warming are based on temperatures
taken at these locations, other spots, like the Hadley Centre, Central England may well show that
temperatures were lower in 2013, than recent years.

Met Office Hadley Centre Central England Temperature 
Interesting anomalies present themselves when analyzing long-term temperature trends. While
global data supports overall increases in temperatures relative to averages, single-location
readings often tell a different story.

The longest continuous temperature record in the world comes from instruments operated in the
UK since the 1600's. The Central English Temperature (CET) dataset chronicles readings taken
since 1659, furnishing mean, minimum, and maximum temperature data, in a number of
presentations.

Monthly figures are compiled, providing mean, minimum and maximum data, available within
three days of each month's end. Data is also updated daily, creating provisional working copies
throughout each month. Mean monthly averages have been supplied since 1659, with daily
figures dating to 1772.

CET readings represent a specific sector of UK, defined at its corners by London, Bristol and
Lancashire. While 2013 temperatures may not be higher than recent year's anomalies, the
reporting station shows similar decade long trends as other monitoring locations, with 2006
standing as the warmest recorded year, according to Central England Temperature readings.

Conclusions 
Regardless of your global warming viewpoint, current data is worth a look. According to
climatologists, who predicted 2013's warmer temperatures, the trend is likely to continue into the
current year, potentially making 2014 one of the warmest years ever.


About Today's Contributor
This guest post is contributed by Rebecca Gray, who writes for Backgroundchecks.org. She
welcomes your comments at her email id: GrayRebecca14@gmail.com.